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Monday, November 24, 2008

Stained Glass Project in the news!

Pick up a copy of today's (11/24/08) Wilkes-Barre Citizens' Voice and turn to page 4 for an article by Erin Moody all about The Stained Glass Project! It even shows some of my photos - including one on the banner at the top of the front page!

Go out and buy a bunch of copies. Support local newspapers!


Erin Moody: Framing Stained Glass Snapshots - Wilkes-Barre Citizens' Voice, November 24, 2008

UPDATE: Huge thanks are due to Erin Moody, not just for this article but for having actually provided the encouragement for me to engage in this project. She first contacted me about possibly doing an article just two days after my initial post on this subject! Her interest encouraged me to become more active with this project, and the realization that there might eventually be an article written made me decide to put up more posts more quickly than I might have otherwise, so that anyone coming here by way of her article would not be disappointed.

So, once again: Thank you, Erin!

9 comments:

dee said...

I only get to read it online, so it doesn't have your pictures, but Congratulations!!!!!

And upon further reflection (no pun intended) I think that's the moon in the Speculum Sin Macula window. The moon reflects the light of the sun; Mary reflects God's love back to us.

Book someone should write; A Guide to Catholic Iconography

Todd HellsKitchen said...

Glad to see you are getting some media attention for your worthwhile project!

Tom Carten said...

Either I'm reading the article on the Tuesday (Nov. 25) Radio Home Visitor, or I will be doing it on Wednesday (Nov. 26). Depends on how it works in with the time schedule.

It's a great idea and check my blog for comments on your project.

northfranklin.blogspot.com

Anonymous said...

this is the power of blogging, no? rock on, soldier!

supertiff said...

oops, that last comment was me, but someone (that batman guy) erased my history, so my name didn't show up. sorry.

Gort said...

Nice job my friend. It's good to see your work get some press.

Anonymous said...

Great project and great photos. I am, though, puzzled by something.

Many of the windows were donated by individuals who are clearly not Polish, nor even Eastern European for that matter. In fact, the names seem to be 100% WASP.

Given the time period when these churches were built and windows installed, I find it intriguing.

In those times, a Protestant wouldn't set foot in a Catholic Church(and sadly may not have been welcome to do so)let alone pay for a stained glass window in a Roman Catholic Church whose congregation was, heaven forbid, not even English, Irish, or Scottish.

Any thoughts? There's a contradiction in play here and I'd love an explanation. Thanks!

...tom... said...

...

Way cool to get some real world recognition of your effort to preserve a bit of local and church history.

While we can not see the pics at the website of the newspaper article we can certainly enjoy them here on the blog.

Congrats again.


...tom...
.

D.B. Echo said...

Thanks, everybody!

But, huge thanks are due to Erin Moody - more than just buried in this comment. She first contacted me about possibly doing an article just two days after my initial post on this subject! Her interest encouraged me to become more active with this project, and the realization that there might eventually be an article written made me decide to put up more posts more quickly than I might have otherwise, so that anyone coming here by way of her article would not be disappointed!

Tom, that's great news! I hope that this weekend I can look down from the choir loft and see a few people taking a closer look at the things so many of us have taken for granted for so long!

Anonymous 11:30, that's an excellent question. The off-the-cuff answer could be that some of these hellbound apostates - sorry, wealthy Protestant businessmen - might have been trying to hedge their bets a little. Or perhaps they were showing some magnanimity towards the people who worked for them and shopped at their stores. But in reality, I don't know, and even if I were to discover a treasure trove of documents relating to the commissioning and installation of these windows, I doubt that the true motivations would be captured on paper. Sadly, any oral historians who might have had some first-hand knowledge of these matters probably fell silent some fifty years ago. But I'll see what I can find out.